Five Bullet Friday, Movement and Rehab Articles, New Research, Pelvic Health Articles, Physical Therapy, The Latest Research in Pelvic Health

Five Bullet Friday: Women’s Health January 10, 2019

Happy Friday!

Today’s Five Bullet Friday:

1. Fragmented Sleep May Trigger Migraine 2 Days Later

2. Patient RESOURCE: Back to Basics: 10 Facts Every Person Should Know About Back Pain

3. Pelvic Pain-Focused Interventions Worthwhile after Vaginal Mesh or Mesh Sling Removal

4. The Fuzz Speech: Explaining Fascia and the Importance of Movement

5. Women’s Health RESEARCH Opportunities Local and Online

Five Bullet Friday: Women’s Health is meant to be a quick, easy to skim resource for you and other health and medical professionals to keep you up to date with all things related to women’s health. My goal for these emails will be to bring to you pertinent and helpful resources for patients (such as short videos or handouts), new research and guidelines, clinical pearls, or anything else interesting related to women’s health! If you’d like to be added to my email list to receive my Five Bullet Friday: Women’s Health, or if you would like suggest particular topics you are eager to hear about, please send an email to cassie@tayloredtraining.ca.

Thank-you, and happy reading!

  1. Fragmented Sleep May Trigger Migraine 2 Days Later

A fascinating new study published in Neurology found that people whose sleep is fragmented during the night are at a higher risk of experiencing a migraine episode not the next day, but the day after that.

Authors Dr. Bertishch knew that sleep and migraines have been linked for a long time, both anecdotally and by scientific research, and wanted to look a bit deeper in to their relationship.

What they found that was sleeping for 6.5 hours or under each night, as well as having poor quality sleep, did not correlate with migraine episodes the next day or day following. However, having a fragmented sleep was linked with a 39% higher risk of migraine on the day after the fragmented sleep.

Further research is needed at this time to better understand this low sleep efficiency and migraine correlation going forward.

Ref: Suzanne M. Bertisch, Wenyuan Li, Catherine Buettner, Elizabeth Mostofsky, Michael Rueschman, Emily R. Kaplan, Jacqueline Fung, Shaelah Huntington, Tess Murphy, Courtney Stead, Rami Burstein, Susan Redline, Murray A. Mittleman. Neurology Dec 2019, 10.1212/WNL.0000000000008740; DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000008740

2. Patient RESOURCE: Back to Basics: 10 Facts Every Person Should Know About Back Pain

Low back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide, and is often associated with costly, ineffective and sometimes harmful care, yet unhelpful patient beliefs about low back pain remain pervasive. This great, free to- the -public resource printed in the British Journal of Sports Medicine outlines 10 facts about our back and back health that everyone should know, especially those who are struggling with back pain.

Find this helpful info graphic along with the rest of the article at the reference below, or see attached to this email.

bjsports-2019-101611-F1.large

Ref: O’Sullivan PB, Caneiro J, O’Sullivan K, et al Back to basics: 10 facts every person should know about back pain British Journal of Sports Medicine Published Online First: 31 December 2019. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2019-101611

3. Pelvic Pain-Focused Interventions Worthwhile after Vaginal Mesh or Mesh Sling Removal:

Transvaginal synthetic mesh and mesh sling placement for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse can yielded adverse outcomes, including pelvic pain and dyspareunia. Pelvic floor physical therapy (and medications and injections as necessary) in compliant patients experience significant improvement of their symptoms, and pelvic pain-focused interventions are a worthwhile recommendation in women with refractory pelvic pain after vaginal mesh or mesh sling removal.

Ref: Abraham, Annie & Scott, Kelly & Christie, Alana & Morita-Nagai, Patricia & Chhabra, Avneesh & Zimmern, Philippe. (2019). Outcomes Following Multidisciplinary Management of Women With Residual Pelvic Pain and Dyspareunia Following Synthetic Vaginal Mesh and/or Mesh Sling Removal. Journal of Womenʼs Health Physical Therapy. 1. 10.1097/JWH.0000000000000140.

4. The Fuzz Speech: Explaining Fascia and the Importance of Movement

This is an older video, but one that I love to share because it is so well done. The Fuzz Speech, but Dr. Gil Hedley, is a fantastic explanation of our fascia, how important movement is, and what can happen to our bodies if we are consistently sedentary. Most patients very much love this video and learn a lot from it. I do say most, however, as Gil does show a cadaver at some point.. so your more squeamish patients may not enjoy the recommendation!

Check out this 5 minute video, here.

5. Women’s Health RESEARCH Opportunities – Local in Kingston, ON and Online

Some amazing and important research is happening right now at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario looking at a number of topics including:

  • Psychoscial and Treatment Factors Associated with Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder
  • Biopsychosocial Investigation of Persistent Genital Arousal Disorders in Women
  • Sexual Wellbeing of Women Using SSRIs
  • Sexual Wellbeing of Women Experiencing Depression Symptoms
  • Sexuality and Breast Cancer
  • Sexuality and Menopause

Some studies are available to online participants, while others are in lab. For more details for you or your patients, visit here.

 

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